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much, sue. let's get back to the breaking news in washington. a vote on the debt ceiling. we will get to john harwood in a moment on what it means for the white house and senate. but first, apple eamon javers on the hill. >> we expect it to pass, maybe tighter than republicans would like the vote count to be, but ultimately what the pleasure would do is extend the debt measure through to may 19th and politically what it does is rearranges the order of the fiscal fights we will have over the next couple of months and it means we will fight first over the sequester. remember that's that across the board budget cut postponed during the fiscal cliff fight in december and january. now that will be the first fight up at the beginning of march. republicans feel that that is a much more safe political ground for them to fight on than to fight over the debt ceiling which of course could threaten a default on the nation's obligations so we do expect this vote within the next couple of minutes here to pass by republicans, then it will go over to the senate side and the white house has signalled
. the debt ceiling debate, a presidential report card, and a quiet market rally. what does it mean for your money? joining us now, jared bernstein and former chief economist to vice president biden. also with us is a chief investment strategist with blackrock. thank you so much for joining us. >> thanks for inviting us. >> thank you. >> russ, let me kick it off with you. friday, a pretty good rally. is this rally for real? do you think it's sustainable going forward as we continue through this earnings period? >> i think in the short term it is. i think we're probably going to hit a road bump in february. the reason i say that is we've got a lot of flows coming into the market early in the year. people are nervous in december. they're coming back into stocks. that's a good thing over the longer term. we do have some issues coming up. the debt ceiling, obviously one of them. the second question is as we start to get january's economic data, how big of a hit do we have from the tax increases, the expiration, the payroll tax hold darks and what do those numbers, which may be a bit on the soft
, debt ceiling. on the other hand, despite all of that liquidity, we have mediocre employment growth, manufacturing data, while it has improved is still around that recessionary line of 50 and to your point around m2 that's very interesting and yet we're still at record low velocity of money. that's very scary. all this money pumped into the system is sitting on the balance sheets of banks, corporations. >> nominal gdp is starting to rise. >> slowly. >> what about the information revolution? now, you made an important point. so far why should raise taxes on investors, terrible idea. i'm hoping do no harm, maybe some small spending cuts so that's not going to be a factor. i don't see a debt default. i think that's off the table. what blt american energy revolution, what about the growth, what about the cheap natural gas and what about how that makes america so competitive? i'm only talking 2.5% growth, not 3%, 4, 5% growth. >> the fertilizer trusts are on fires. ammonia is going to be cheap, that's terrific. but here's a factoid for you. kmn's exports to asia are up 20% year on year.
if there's no solution on the debt ceiling by the deadline day. >>> and this guy, he's teed off, the golfer phil michakelson tee off over his taxes. and he's not going to take it anymore, or is he? sue herera is live at the new york stock exchange. >> earnings are front and center with j & j, dupont, travelers all out with results. more on them in a few minutes. let's get you ahead of the curve. google is getting ready to report its latest results after the bell. fears about an ad revenue and major focus on those shares. google right now is down 3 bucks on the trading session. john is in silicon valley with what investor s need to know ahead of the numbers. >> couple of important themes this quarter, mobile and mobile. mobile's impacted on the core business. as more people do searches from mobile devices, google's revenue has been coming down. it's more than likely this trend will continue as smartphone and tablet sales spike. cbc could come down 11%. it was down 15% last quarter. then we have the nexus 7 and nexts 10 tablets. in q3, some analysts estimate google sold around 100 million tab
in less than an hour. >> expected to tee off a vote on the debt ceiling bill. what's their new plan? we'll go live to washington next, and even with the immediate threat of the debt ceiling ahead, another's contrarian view coming up. >> chip murky's quarterly result are due out now. those numbers coming up as we continue on the "closing bell." . ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. there. i said it. they don't have pictures of my kids. they don't have my yoga mat. and still, i feel at home. could it be the flat screen tv? the not so mini fridge? ♪ the different free dinner almost every weeknight? or maybe, it's all of the above. and all the rest. am i home? nope. but it almost feels that way. homewood suites by hilton. be at home. >>> all right. they are teeing off this new debt ceiling bill. john boehner will be housing a meeting with key republican leaders at 5:00 p.m. eastern time. >> reporter: >> that's coming
for the eurozone, as well, it's not just about the debt ceiling, they have to get the debt down. the debt ceiling may get raised, but it's not being tackled long-term. >> it seems every single time consistently we get the opposite outcome. which means some areas are consistent and it raises debt levels going forward. >> it seems to me as though we can't fix this one because democratically it's not possible. why? because there are so many verses who are automatically vote to increase the debt because the number of people who own entitlements or benefits is relatively high. and i think you're seeing this failure both in the u.s., in germany and to an extent in the uk. >> the trouble is for all of those economies maybe some of the european ones are under pressure by the government. but the problem is, if you look at issues in the u.s., they're just so low. there's no ability to cut in the long-term. how do you push through entitlement reform and address those issues, especially if there's no market pressure right now? >> my sense is that you don't. i don't understand how that can be achieved and, th
, and for very good reason. if what they're say something we're not going to play debt ceiling leverage anymore, which has obviously been the president's position, that's good. my feeling is it's probably the latter. i think there are enough kind of economic grown-ups in the room to really control the folks who have threatened to use that kind of leverage. >> but the senate has not had a budget resolution pass through the senate in, what is it, four years now? >> april, 2009. >> that feels to me pretty shameful frankly. i don't know the politics and i'm not exactly sure why that's the case, but isn't that a critical step in bridging the gap and making progress on these issues where you can not go to these sort of extra legal things like using the debt ceiling as leverage, but you can use the process as it is intended to be used. >> i agree, and it's an interesting quid pro quo for the republicans to agree to the first three months of extension of the debt ceiling. >> and to hold their own pay hostage. we won't pay ourselves. >> even though i think the debt plays better outside and holds more le
made this deal yeah, we are going to extend the debt ceiling. now, it gets attached to a balanced budget. >> two points, in regard to congressman welch. when you have liberal s ip the house and senate, that is their plan to spend more money. i know you are talking about our budget larry, but we have to step back. there is going to be no budget that takes place unless the senate passes a budget. but to get congress both chambers to work together, we need the senate to pass the budget. so we said no budget senate, no pay. that is a way to get the senate to engage. >> i'm not challenging your logic, but i'm challenging your process. the series of dates that is so important one is april 15th. i preseume that is paul ryan's budget. i don't see how you can vote tomorrow on a debt extepgs nsio increase and attach a balanced budget before you know what the balanced budget is. i see that as a problem. i want peter to tackle that. >> we are passing the no budget no pay act. it is going to give both chambers, the senate and the house to pass the budgets. what you are hearing is, the house is
and texas instruments. house leaders are expected to vote tomorrow to extend the debt ceiling deadline until may 19th. the gop measure doesn't specify an amount, but would lead let the government borrow what it needs to meet its obligation for that period. the strategy shift was agreed to last week and would let republicans focus on other fiscal fights in march such as ook automatic spending cuts delayed by the deal and the potential resolution. julian callow is still with us. julian, do you take this news as a positive development for markets or are you concerned about still the prospect of a government shutdown as others are calling for once we hit some of those further deadlines? >> yeah. i think that is quite positive, really. it shows that there is some desire not to up the vote too much on the side of the house. republicans at this stage. i think it's actually very important if we think about what it means for both financial markets and for the u.s. economy. obviously, financial market conditions have improved noticeably. there's less uncertainty around. that should come through in ter
at hand right now. >> right. >> that being the debt ceiling. >> the debt ceiling is a big issue. the fiscal cliff was a big issue on the tax side. we've extended the debt ceiling to may. that really could be july. i don't know that they represent the risks that a lot of people thought was represented in august 2011 heading into it. we realize hindsight, yields did not spike dramatically. we didn't get a massive number of investors whether it was institutions, pension funds that were forced out of treasuries. because of that aaa rating gone. i think we learned some lessons. but i still think unfortunately washington and the ranker and the political system remains one of them. >> it sounds you're not as worried about washington. >> we're sadly becoming immune to their antics. >> we'll leave it there. good to see you. thank you so much. >>> about ten minutes to go before we close it up on monday on wall street here. dow jones industrial average still hanging in just below 13,900. >>> well, it has been the feud that continues to be the buzz on wall street. >> and in 2003 i get a cal
down with maria one day after the gop-led house v e voted to temporarily lift the debt ceiling. >> thanks so much, bill. we are talking economy and politics with representative eric cantor right now, and representative, great to have you on the program. >> great to be here with you. >> thank you so much for joining us. >> let's get right to t.yesterday or this week rather the house passed a debt limit extension until mid-may. what does that buy us? >> well, what is buys us is a time for this debate about borrowing and spending to really develop into what i hope will be a robust discussion that will yield some results. we know that for almost four years the united states senate has not passed a budget, and that's part of the problem that's been contributing to the out-of-control spending in washington, and what we've said is we will extend the debt ceiling for three months to allow time for the united states senate to write a budget so we can then begin the discussions on how we're going to repay this money that we're going to borrow as well as begin to manage down the debt long
the debt ceiling. [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. >>> good morning from l.a. one of the biggest events that investors have to look forward to over the next year is the prospect that hilton could be returned to the u.s. stock market. now, remember, blackstone took it private at the height of the market. $26 billion, a whopping $26 billion in 2007. the question that investors and the rest of the industry want to know is, in that private environment, what has private equity done with hilton. for the first time we'll start pricing apart hilton for the sake of investors and the rest of the industry. joining me here is the president for development at hilton. welcome to the program. >> good morning, simon. >> what have you done in particular, what has the international expansion been for hilton whilst under blackstone? >> in the last five years we're focused on growth. we've added in the last four or five years, where we've had these terrible economic conditions, we've added 1,000 hotels.
's scratching their heads. and now with the possibility of having the debt ceiling extension out to may, what you're going to see now is traders and other people that have positioned themselves to sell short-term volatility and buy it out to march. especially in the vix. now that's going to get rolled out to april, to may. you'll see this continued complacency. and when i say complacency, i don't think that's a bad thing. but the continued complacency in kind of this area of low volatility. that's just going to get extended out now. we get a couple more big earnings or good earnings surprises. and say apple comes out today with -- with some good guidance, we could see the vix call to the 11 handle which is really -- that's almost unprecedented. >> continued complacency, but the news of earnings is pushing forward? you can't fight the trend? >> no, you can't. what i'm seeing is traders especially that have wanted to be short or traders that have been buying, you know, upside calls in the vix, they're almost ready to throw in the towel. it's almost -- i don't. to say a capitulation, but guys do
. think debt ceiling when we return. [ male announcer ] this is not my home. there. i said it. they don't have pictures of my kids. they don't have my yoga mat. and still, i feel at home. could it be the flat screen tv? the not so mini fridge? ♪ the different free dinner almost every weeknight? or maybe, it's all of the above. and all the rest. am i home? nope. but it almost feels that way. homewood suites by hilton. be at home. >>> welcome back, everybody. the s&p is indicated slightly down as the is dow jones. the nasdaq is staying higher. we did hear from dupont which came in with better than expected numbers and ta dow component is up by 1% at this point? >> if you split the bid and the ask, it would be. >> 1.4% from the free market. >> our headlines this morning, a tropical storm intense fieging off of australia's coast. it's bringing nearly half the world's iron ore trade to a halt today. right now, let's get today's national forecast. reynolds wolf joins us from the weather channel. reynolds, it's great to see you this morning. >> great seeing you guys, too. the story down unde
. look there's a reason why the republicans in the white house caved on the debt ceiling. the public is not with them on these issues. >> don't know. kate, you have a little different view. i think republicans now back in the driver's seat because they cooperated on raising the debt ceiling. they forced the senate democrats to put up a budget. the next thing will be the continuing resolution, short term spending cuts. i think the gop by stopping taxes is back in play, they are back in play. >> i love your optimism, larry. i wish i could be jumping up and down with you. but i'm afraid the republicans are in full retreat. i'm hoping -- i know they won't agree to this tax increase. the senator is absolutely right. but the problem is the democrats are using this as another opportunity to put republicans of throwing granny off the cliff, caring only about their millionaire and billionaire buddies. patty murray said we'll put it on the people who best can afford it. it worked for president obama, the democrats, like the cbs news political director said is to go for the jugular, to cut the
expecting another battle of the debt ceiling? >> we love the stock market last year. yes, i don't think the battle is going to be as brutal as the last-minute fiscal cliff negotiations. but i do agree that the year will probably start out a little slow because a lot of plans were put on hold in the fourth quarter. but look. so far 70% of the companies that have reported earnings over the last couple of weeks have been above expectations. so that's a good trend. we think gdp will build as we go through the year. and so we continue to like this market. you have to be a little cautious when the dow is with i think 2% of its all-time record high nap is amazing. that is really amazing. >> wow. looks like we got a blowout here on yahoo. let me get you the numbers here. 32 cents a share is where they're reporting the fourth quarter on earnings. revenue also looking better than expected at $1.22 billion in revenue. that compares to an estimate of $1.21 billion. we saw yahoo trading just as the numbers were coming out. 32 cents a share on $1.22 billion. >> maria? >> yes. >> little calling on the
or the debt ceiling or the election. it is totally working this market. so i have to go back to the mathematical well. what can i tell you, we want to know what the queen thinks it could go next. take a look at this chart. the s&p said it would. and shortly thereafter she told us that the low was likely to be pivotal, as a key part of her methodology. you heard me talk about fibonacci ratios. these numbers are 23.6%. 38.2%. 50 % and 69.1%. it is eerie and according to many technicians it is a crucial turning point in price targets. and you apply the ratios that i mentioned and there is always an important level for that security. based on that low the s&p was ready to roar and she gave us a price target of 1510. last time we highlighted her work she said that if the s&p could break out it would be a straight line straight shot to her 1510 target. sure enough, i went back to her for info. so what does she think about the s&p prospects right now? since it took out the key high it made on december 18th before the big end of the year sell off, brodin thinks we might need a new hi
on senate democrats to make a move on the debt ceiling. joining us this morning, senator bob casey, a democrat of pennsylvania, vice chairman of the joint economic committee. senator, good morning to you. >> good morning. good to be with you. >> so the house says no budget, no one gets paid. you have introduced legislation if there's a shutdown, no one gets paid. why don't we stop paying everybody and just call it a day? >> well, look, i think it's important that we have measures introduced to hold folks accountable for what i think would be irresponsible behavior to allow default. but i think we are moving the right direction now. there is action by the house, there's a positive step. we have to build on t but i think it will pass. and it give, i think, some certainty on this specific question of the debt ceiling and the question of default, because we know from 2011, the adverse impact 2,000 points in the -- that the dow lost. we know the consumer confidence took a six-month hit because of the debt ceiling fight. so, to take that off the table as a big washington fight helps a lo
to that a constitutional crisis, in a way, because this whole debt ceiling has been a weapon that the house of representatives has used to gain power. it's not just the republicans versus the democrats. it's the house versus the president. >> meanwhile, these markets are on fire. another good week for the market. the s&p 500 hitting a new five-year high. what is driving stocks? and do you think it's sustainable for the year? some of the risk has been pulled out of the of the market. so the most recent is three months. some of the ris ks. and maybe just that the election isn't determined. maybe some are happy. some are, some aren't. but it's solved. markets don't like uncertainty. so even though it wasn't very likely the european union would fall apart, even though it wasn't very likely the u.s. would fall on its debt, i think that lifted markts a lot. >> meanwhile, new appointments in the obama administration. timmy geithner, the last day was on friday. i want to ask you about his successor. he's certainly served during a tumultuous time. >> if i'm going to give him one grade, i'm going to
backed off that so you didn't get that outcome. at the same time, they've pushed off the debt ceiling for a few months. so the body language out of washington has been more constellatory. so when you get to this point where you think about what the deficit might look like this year, i don't think you're going to be looking at a balanced budget so soon. you can't sustain trillion dollar deficiter year after year after year doubling the debt so many years and still think that the market is going to accept that over time. they know the market needs to move away from this, but it's going to away longer process. >> kevin and mike will be with us for the rest of the hour. >> and it's time for the global markets report. kelly evans is standing by in london. i could string up a lot of thing to talk to you about, kelly. you're very close to davos. i don't know. we -- i don't really feel like i've missed anything, really. but you're still close. you could have jetted over there easily and joined in with, you know, john legend and charlie thero this e, andrew ross sorkin. >> i was hoping maybe s
world is not smouldering, but greece was not aflame, the united states had just done the debt ceiling. i said you know what? because the ecb finally started acting like the federal reserve, the panic is now over. didn't say the crisis is over, but the panic is over. >> you said carry stability. you talked about tend of financial panic. >> others are saying cautious optimism. >> right. but there's two separations. once we get done dealing with the panic. we'll be farced then we're not part of a business cycle. ben there, sdun this. >> but you've got to get ceiling debate in the u.s. you've got the italian elections. so we will see. >> the perception over here is that the extreme part of the republican party has backed off on this issue of the debt ceiling. >> well, sure, they're extending it. >> that's the perception there. >> steve, there you go. jon fortt better watch out, that's all i'm saying. >> he's covering the economy. we can swap for a while. >> that's not a badi. what do you think, kelly? >> receive, i have the blackberry 11 for the keyboard, right? >> no. you'll elect the virtu
. investors are awaiting the house vote this afternoon on postponing the debt ceiling. news in europe, david cameron vowing a referendum on whether britain remains in the eu. in japan, longest losing streak in two months. china awaits data, that's out tonight. the road map in the u.s. starts off at the golden arches. u.s. same-store sales up 9% for mcdonald's, helped by the dollar menu and mcrib. >> ibm and google surging premarket. google gets its price target raised by six firms this morning on better than expected earnings. >> coach getting pummeled this morning, blaming its big earnings miss on weakness in north america during the holidays. it says it is transforming itself into a lifestyle brand. >> apple's results tonight after the bell. could this be the quarter that marks the bottom on the stock. will tim cook talk about the next omg product in the pipeline. >>> we'll start with mcdonald's. it earned 1.38 nds the fourth quarter, it exceeded estimates. ceo don thompson said for the near term, mcdonald's expects top and bottom line growth to remain under pressure with january global co
, you know, when it comes to this debt ceiling issue, or it comes to who's going to be elected, or health care issues or what have you. how is that -- how do you put that in to your investing hat? >> well, everything is a transaction, and it won't have an effect on prices, in any event, unless it has an effect on a transaction. so what i do is i know who the buyers and the sellers are. and then by thinking that through, i think how will it have an effect on transactions. far more important than, over the long term, the leader of a country will have some effect on the whole overall health of the economy. but even -- they can't even res. they're, you know, it's a very difficult challenge. the whole political system. you could be president of the united states and it doesn't mean you can change policy. then, if policy changes, it has to basically change the things that produce -- have an effect on productivity. it's something that's peripheral largely. like, for example, a bigger issue is how does financial transactions work such as if you lower interest rate, and you have nothing
for once weren't totally ridiculous with the debt ceiling but they extend the debt ceiling -- >> richard, stay with us. austan you're here for the rest of the show. we'll have more. at 1:45, the aflac duck was brought in with multiple lacerations to the wing and a fractured beak. surgery was successful, but he will be in a cast until it is fully healed, possibly several months. so, if the duck isn't able to work, how will he pay for his living expenses? aflac. like his rent and car payments? aflac. what about gas and groceries? aflac. cell phone? aflac, but i doubt he'll be using his phone for quite a while cause like i said, he has a fractured beak. [ male announcer ] send the aflac duck a get-well card at getwellduck.com. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of
banks are putting in. we're through the u.s. elections, ahead of the debt ceiling debate. in some sense there isn't an immediate crisis. it's a question now whether ceos can get through the real economic fundamentals. in some ways we're betwiked and between, kelly. >> i like the scarf, ross. >> yeah. that's the point. look, there's plenty to come on our coverage today. let me recap some of the people we're going to be talking to. john lipinski, formerly of the imf. and hamish tyrwhitt, construction group out of australia. we saw rates dip a little today. suggesting there's room to cut rates. and the executive dean of peking university. we're more relaxed about china, more relaxed than three or four months ago. we'll get the inside there. all of that is coming up on today's "worldwide exchange." how are the markets looking? >> perfect. we'll check the markets in a second. i want to bring news out of the bank upon spain saying fourth quarter gdp was down 1.not -- 1.7% drop, it was .6 drop. pretty large. and 2012 gdp down 1.3%, down from a contraction of 0.4% in 2011. more difficult news f
another debt ceiling debate and debacle would not be helpful here. i think there's so much minon the sidelines between the retail investor and the corporate america today, has so much money to invest. get rid of some of that uncertainty and this economy will go. i'm quite bullish about that. >> can you provide guidance for this year without knowing exactly what washington is going to come up with? >> we gave a range. we don't give guidance. we give a range on a conservative side and optimistic side. we're right inside that range. had a great start to the year. we're ahead of consensus. we her record asset gathering and record guidance sales and great control. had a great start. >> had a good three months in the stock as well at this point. fred, always good to see you. >> thanks for coming by. >> the president of amayor trade joining us today. dell shares sharply higher today. after david faber broke the news that microsoft is now in talks to help finance that buyout of dell. david joins us now with more details. they are getting a party together, aren't they? >> yes, they may ve
, the sequestration was supposed to happen january 1st. punt on that one. debt ceiling, supposed to hit that. now it will be steve 19. there's no austerity. >> what michael is saying in a very long-winded way is don't fight the fed. not fighting the fed. the fed, europe, japan's now with b to go hog wild. >> sure, sure. >> the whole world is printing new money. >> abe, the new prime minister of japan, japan is at least discussing a new quantitative easing scheme for them. they are going to be printing a lot of yen. >> the point is all that tends to be good for assets like stocks? >> very stimulative. europe will have to start printing money as well to deal with their issues so you don't want to fight that liquidity. >> earnings don't matter then? >> earnings do matter. i think probably revenue will matter a lot more than earnings by the end of 2013. earnings matter and fundamentals matter but the backdrop is we know what we think may not be relevant or what bernanke thinks is relative, he'll keep this a liquid environment for the foreseeable future. >> jim bianco, earnings matter. steve's liked t
a fight around the debt ceiling? do you think we'll have a disruption around this inability to compromise? >> i know nothing more than you other than what i read in the paper today and it seems like they are already starting to. could mice by pushing it out and asking for a budget which i think all seems rational and compromise by the way so i applaud them. >> what does your gut tell you about all the money moving into stocks recently? had a fantastic early 2013. do you think this is sustainable? >> the economy grows it's sustainable, and i still think you can buy american companies at pretty good prices. these are some of the world class companies, you know, not just american companies, european and japanese and chinese companies, but you are still buying at fairly good prices and the alternatives aren't that good, yeah, i'm comfortable owning stocks right now. >> are you saying that kind of comfort on the part of investors, the private bank, wealth management? what are you seeing in terms of the sentiment? >> i think, yes, but not -- it's not -- you and i have seen real bull markets, no
further and then we'll see in three months' time what we discuss and how we deal with the debt ceiling, that's not especially helpful. that's what actually a lot of u.s. leaders complained about with the europeans about a year ago. they were saying oh, you know just pushing the can down the road yet again. well, sure. >> i guess the whole issue of do you provide stimulus to a weak and anemic story or do you cut back in a time that things are really not growing so adding austerity to an already weak story? >> what is needed is confidence. and you need to restore confidence in the way an economy is run. so things will vary depending on the strength of the currency, depending on the financing needs, the financing situation of the country and for some countries austerity, strong right from the start, is needed. when, you know, the situation of finance -- when the financing is under huge pressure. as has been the case with some european countries. in other situations, where there is a degree of confidence where markets know that the governments are serious about what they're doing, the pace
. so the resolution of the debt ceiling crisis in particular, i think was a big moment for the market. we are targeting 2.25% on the ten-year over the next couple of months. as you mentioned, economic momentum is getting a little better. really, the underlying trend of things is not so bad for the economy. and if you do get, as your previous guest noted, another move up of 3%, 4%, 5% in equities, then that could easily be the impetus to get treasury yields even higher than they are today. >> the big question, and we should talk about it, is the losses that people could suffer moving forward. but for the moment, if we take a historical perspective, we're still at very low interest rates, aren't we. 4%, 5% would be a normal rate. i assume this is not necessarily at the moment at this level a problem in slowing the economy. >> no, we're not panicked. in fact, we think that treasury yields will probably find a plateau somewhere around that 2.25% and end the year somewhere about where they are today. treasury yields, at least at the moment, are heavily influenced by supply and demand facto
overseeing t.a.r.p. and navigating the financial crisis to facing off with congress against the debt ceiling and the fiscal cliff, here is a look at the past four years as geithner gets set to exit. >> nbc news is now reporting that timothy geithner will be the treasury secretary under president-elect barack obama. >> tim geithner offers not just extensive experience shaping economic policy and managing financial markets. he also has an unparalleled understanding of our current economic crisis. >> the ayes are 60, nays are 34. >> i, timothy f. geithner, i pledge all of my ability to help outline that challenge. we are outlining a new fiscal stability plan. >> will you step down from your post sdmp. >> it is a great privilege for me to serve this president and i am very pleased to have a chance to address the range of concerns you said. i agree with almost nothing in what you said. >> we've got the t.a.r.p. it's suppose to expire. >> we are working to put the t.a.r.p. out of its misery and no one will be happier than i am. >> i am complete confidence in tim geithner. >> lots of great people w
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